Newsletter

June 18th, 2012

Some time ago, our dear general manager did something that seemed completely crazy to me. Does that not shock you? Well, I guess most of you have met her. Still, this, for me, was too big of a risk. She asked one of our regular guests, someone who not only, himself, was one of this little hotel’s fixtures, but whose company represented kind of a lot of our monthly business, to start painting pictures to hang on our walls. He was asked to work with Silicon Valley’s agricultural history, but otherwise given total freedom, and the first piece was to hang, not small and forgivable in a bathroom, as would maybe be safe for an artistic trial like this, but right over the front desk. Both agreed that if she didn’t like it, it would not be hung, but, really, could both of them really stay cool enough to keep their same old friendly relationship if he worked for months on a painting and that she then rejected? I was not so sure. Luckily, no one ever had to find out. Both parties deemed the project a success, and I’m sure none of you have failed to notice the vivid flashback of a rural past that now greets you when you check in.

And that was just the beginning. Mr. Dwayne Holst now has four paintings up on our walls, with more to come. I’ll bet you can figure out for yourself which ones are his. Plus, she’s now commissioning work from the legendary Pete Escovedo, who stayed here for a few nights last year, to hang in our guest rooms. Of course, it’s his music that he’s known for, not his painting, so I was, again, scared when I heard that she was doing this, convinced that our fearless leader had been seduced by his name. Wrong again! You may already have seen for yourself, or else you will very soon. His work is slowly meandering into more and more rooms, a little band here, an abstract there. They’re simple and lovely, and just personal enough to not be random hotel art.

It’s a fun little game our boss is playing here, finding the artists in our midst. Our humble home away from home is getting denser, more complicated, and our community more interwoven. I’m sorry for being scared. She’s completely right on here.

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